“Meanings” by Ven. Nyanamoli still available

Posted: February 6, 2019 by pathpress in News

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New Edition of The Hermit of Bundala

Posted: January 30, 2019 by pathpress in News

Biography of Ven. Ñāṇavīra Thera written by Ven. Hiriko.

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Attha / yoni

Posted: December 20, 2018 by pathpress in Dhamma Article

by Ven. Akiñcano

I.

tasmā hi paṇḍito poso, sampassaṃ atthamattano.
yoniso vicine dhammaṃ, evaṃ tattha visujjhati.

MN 143

How are we to translate these lines of poetry into English? First of all, we must decide if we want to create something which will have some poetic value in English. If we are to do this, it is highly likely that we will find ourselves having to stray away from the Pāli. Alternatively, we can try to stay as closely as possible to the Pāli. This would be my preference. Our primary aim is not to produce some beautiful words and phrases but to understand the teachings spoken by the Tathāgatha and his noble disciples. Read the rest of this entry »

Peripheral Awareness

Posted: November 8, 2018 by pathpress in Bhikkhu's Notebook, Dhamma Article

by Ajahn Nyanamoli Thero

Mindfulness done correctly is when the mind is anchored in something. That something must be a thing that is not directly attended to, but instead, has to be a reference point to the attended thing (hence we call it “anchor”). If a thing is not directly attended to but there, we call that thing to be a “background”. It’s a background to a thing we attend (which makes that thing a “foreground”). This is the basic principle of mindfulness, on which we can expand here below. Read the rest of this entry »

Series of Talks on “Notes on Dhamma”

Posted: September 24, 2018 by pathpress in News

vlcsnap-2018-09-18-18h47m14s284 New Series of Talks on Ven. Nanavira Thera’s “Notes on Dhamma” will be posted on YouTube at the link below. Bhante Nanamoli is clarifying each individual Note and responding to the questions related to it. This means we can expect one video per Note. Later there might be more recordings in response to further requests for clarification, if so happens.

 

THE TALKS: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUPMn2PfEqIzfbkNHwmDmPW6T314crv44

Notes on Dhamma: http://www.nanavira.org/notes-on-dhamma

Hillside Hermitage: http://www.hillsidehermitage.org/

Kāyagatā sati – Mindfulness of the body

Posted: September 21, 2018 by pathpress in Dhamma Article

by Ven. Akiñcano

The Buddha tells us that there is one thing which, when developed, leads to the following:

  • great existential dread (AN 1:576)1
  • great benefit (AN 1:577)
  • great safety from bondage (AN 1:578)
  • mindfulness-&-awareness (AN 1:579)
  • the attainment of knowing-&-seeing (AN 1:580)
  • a pleasant dwelling in this very life (AN 1:581)
  • the realisation of the fruit of wisdom-&-liberation (AN 1:582)
  • the realisation of the fruit of stream-entry (AN 1:596)
  • the realisation of the fruit of once-returning (AN 1:597)
  • the realisation of the fruit of non-returning (AN 1:598)
  • the realisation of the fruit of arahatship (AN 1:599)

Read the rest of this entry »

Kāmā

Posted: July 17, 2018 by pathpress in Dhamma Article

by Ven. Akiñcano

dujjānaṃ kho etaṃ, kaccāna, tayā aññadiṭṭhikena aññakhantikena aññarucikena aññatrayogena aññatrācariyakena—kāmā vā kāmasukhaṃ vā…

This is difficult to understand, Kaccāna, for you with another view, with another belief, with another influence, with an association elsewhere, with a teacher from elsewhere—kāmā or the pleasure of kāmā

MN 80

1. “Let’s make some distinctions…”1

The Pali word kāmā is perhaps most frequently rendered in English as “sensual pleasures”. This translation is, I think, rather misleading, given the fact that the Buddha explicitly distinguished between kāmā and the pleasure that arises dependent on them. Read the rest of this entry »

Kammaṭṭhāna

Posted: July 11, 2018 by pathpress in Dhamma Article

by Ven. Akiñcano

The word kammaṭṭhāna is usually translated as “meditation object” and it plays a central role in the Visuddhimagga, Burmese-style meditation systems, the Thai Forest tradition, and in many people’s meditation practice. According to the Visuddhimagga, one should develop samādhi by focusing on a single object. Here is Venerable Ñāṇamoli’s translation of the relevant passage:

kenaṭṭhena samādhīti samādhānaṭṭhena samādhi. kimidaṃ samādhānaṃ nāma? ekārammaṇe cittacetasikānaṃ samaṃ sammā ca ādhānaṃ, ṭhapananti vuttaṃ hoti. tasmā yassa dhammassānubhāvena ekārammaṇe cittacetasikā samaṃ sammā ca avikkhipamānā avippakiṇṇā ca hutvā tiṭṭhanti, idaṃ samādhānanti veditabbaṃ.

In what sense is it “concentration”? It is concentration in the sense of concentrating. What is this thing called concentrating? It is centering consciousness and consciousness-concomitants evenly and rightly on a single object—placing, is what is meant. So it is the state, in virtue of which consciousness and its concomitants remain evenly and rightly on a single object undistracted and unscattered—that should be understood as “concentrating”.

Vsm (Ch. III, §3)

In order to do this, we are later told (Ch. III, § 28), we should approach a kalyāṇamitta, one who can give us a kammaṭṭhāna. With the right kammaṭṭhāna—the one, from a list of forty, which most suits our own particular temperament—we are then supposed to focus our mind on this, so as to become concentrated. Read the rest of this entry »